Posted: March 3, 2017 by Justin Bankes

Thank you to everyone who came out and last night with us! We had a great time getting to know each of you.

Liatrio is increasingly interested in helping to promote the learning of real world tools as well as giving back to Chico State and the community. Like software development, these tech talks need feedback in order to learn what went well and vice versa so we ask that you answer a few questions on our Liatrio Spring 2017 Tech Talk Feedback survey. Please be honest! We won’t hold it against you.

We talked about the internship quite a bit last night and we hope we answered any questions you had. If you would like to know more then read some of the older posts below or reach out to chico@liatrio.com. The blogs are from current interns about their experience at Liatrio. Finally, if you are interested in applying for an internship with Liatrio then fill out the internship form.

Again, thank you for showing up and having a great time with us. See you next year!

 

Posted: March 2, 2017 by Shane MacBride

Reflecting on Six Months as a DevOps Intern

Today marks the beginning of my sixth month as a DevOps Engineering Intern at Liatrio. Since I started, I have been introduced to an abundance of industry practices, tools, and philosophies prevalent in the DevOps community. I’ve noticed that there are quite a few parallels between past school projects at Chico State and my internship.

A college education as a whole is priceless, but there are a few skills I picked up through coursework that have been particularly useful in my internship. The most used one has definitely been Git; the only difference has been that it is used more collaboratively in the industry compared to school projects that are typically done individually. Using Git also led me to become proficient at creating visually appealing Markdown documents, which has proven to be a great documentation tool for an intern’s arsenal.

There have been countless moments during this past half-year of my internship where I found myself being grateful for taking specific courses at Chico State. Specifically, I found that learning Javascript throughout Computer Graphics Programming gave me an upper hand when tackling other unfamiliar languages. Unix System Administration, the second elective I chose at Chico State, introduced me to the world of Shell Programming and sharpened my Linux skills. A couple core computer science classes I found relevant were Introduction to Networking, for the basics of networking, and Computer Security which helped shed some light on private key pair etiquette and vulnerabilities to watch out for when hosting applications.

As a computer scientist, I’m always on the lookout for more efficient methods of practicing my craft. The DevOps Engineering internship has transformed many aspects of my continuing coursework and side projects for the better.

I plan on making use of GitHub Wiki, because I’ve learned how important detailed documentation is. Collaborating on Git is no longer daunting to me, because I’ve found that the Feature Branching strategy simplifies it. I now make ample use of GitHub Projects as Kanban boards for all of my repositories to better organize them. One example of this can be found on a side project I’ve recently started to simplify basic Amazon EC2 management called Kinkajou.

Working with AWS throughout the internship has opened my eyes to a lot of its potential as well. Since they offer a free tier, I configured a modded Minecraft server for fun. I plan on turning off this Minecraft instance in favor of hosting my Advanced Web Development project at the end of this semester. However, I may go with Heroku, a great PaaS. Regardless of where I deploy the project, I’m definitely going to integrate Travis CI to automatically test and deploy it. All of these tools are great at implementing DevOps practices in small scale projects.

One of the reasons DevOps is so great is the speed at which it evolves; I look forward to seeing what new tools and practices I come across as I continue my journey.

Posted: February 28, 2017 by Justin Bankes

Chico State Tech Talk: Spring 2017

 

DevOps Tech Talk

We hope your semester is going well! Chris and the team are getting ready for another tech talk with the university. We are going to be going over using TravisCI with Heroku which can be used for your projects in classes like Software Engineering, Advanced Web Development, Senior Projects, Personal Projects, or even a small startup. The best part — they’re free to use for students! Get ahead of the curve with the tools you’ll see in the wild.

This is a special tech talk for Liatrio because it’s the first with our new manager for the Chico office. He’s adamant about helping others grow and would love to meet the local talent.

Also, as with the past tech talks, if you’re interested in an internship with us then this is the place to go. Get your feet wet with a part of computer science that many don’t get the chance to try. If you end up liking it then you should consider applying for an internship. We have immediate internship opportunities available here in Chico where you’ll work with Joe, Eddie, Matt, Shane, Tyler, and Justin.

The Tech Talk is Thursday, March 2nd, 2017 at 6pm. Come out for Pizza, DevOps, and to hang out with the Liatrio team!

Posted: February 15, 2017 by Eddie Bracho

Transitioning from Intern to Full Time Employee

Hi! My name is Eddie Bracho and I’m a recent graduate (Fall 2016) of the CSU Chico Computer Science undergraduate program. I joined Liatrio during their second round of intern recruiting in October 2016 with only months left to graduate. This put me in a weird spot since the rest of the interns were mapped out to work at least one year before graduating and going full time. I must have said something right during my interview, since Chris decided to put faith in me and hire me anyways.

Time transpired as usual and after three months I signed a contract and was officially dubbed FTE (Full-Time Eddie). I wasn’t quite finished with Liatrio’s “DevOps Bootcamp” program that the interns go through, but as a full time employee it was important that I spend time at our client site in the Bay so I could be around the big shots. It was decided that I would alternate each week between the client site and our Chico office, so that I wouldn’t be completely divorced from the rest of the interns.

I remember my first Bay Area team standup vividly; there were so many foreign acronyms and project labels being thrown around that I started to feel dizzy! As a consulting company for large enterprise clients, we have our hands in a staggering variety of teams, projects and technologies. I remember feeling a hint of anxiety in the back of my head – what could I, an inexperienced new graduate, possibly bring to the table here?

During my first week I was paired up with Drew (who all the Chico interns speak of as a sort of Linux sysadmin god). Drew was heading a large infrastructure automation project for our client. He had already completed most of the legwork, but there were still a number of technical debt items that he wanted to get out of the way. My first assignment was to write a set of Rake tasks to help automate documentation and enforce the required versions of tools used to run the project locally. It was a very programming-heavy assignment and I felt right at home using a high-level language like Ruby. I ended up sharing some of the work with an intern in Chico, Matt, so that we could complete it in a reasonable time frame. After putting a lot of work documenting it and trying to make is user-friendly, it was finally ready to demo to the rest of the team. It was a very proud and validating moment for me to be able to show off the work I’ve been doing and receive feedback from the Bay team.

Since that first week in January I’ve been bouncing around a variety of projects ranging from “automated Jenkins pipelines” using a Groovy dsl, to a more in-depth infrastructure automation assignment involving setting up a remote system monitoring service.

Though I might be in a taller building and dressed a little fancier, at the end of the day I’m still doing the same thing interns have been doing in Chico – discovering, learning, and working with awesome tools and processes to improve software delivery. With that being said, here’s a few things I’ve had to learn and improve on along the way:

1. Build good relationships with the people you work with.

During the first few weeks I was pretty quiet and generally kept to myself when I wasn’t discussing work. Maybe it was because I felt a little culture-shocked and intimidated from being in this new highly professional environment, but as soon as I started going out to lunches with coworkers and having more non-work conversations I felt way more relaxed and productive!

2. Be vocal about what you are doing.

In a small startup company like Liatrio, the supply of work is endless and everyone is always busy. As a new team member, people want to be aware of what you’re up to and what is causing you trouble, but no one has the time to be constantly attentive. What ended up working for me was creating an “eb-onboarding” slack channel where I would post frequent updates about what I was doing and blockers I was running into. This allowed everyone to see my progress and chime in with advice when they had a spare moment.

3. Get good at organizing your time.

Being full time you are never just working on one thing. There’s always several things that you can be doing, and you need to be wise about how much time you spend on each task. Coming out of college I was very much in the mindset of taking on one assignment at a time and working at it until it was completed. But that doesn’t work when you have several ongoing projects – you need to divide out your time so that you don’t fall behind on any of them.

It’s been fun and interesting being the “guinea pig” at Liatrio for onboarding an intern to full time. Hopefully this has allowed us to figure out most of the kinks so that the next set of interns will have an even smoother transition!

Posted: February 2, 2017 by Tyler Gering

What To Expect From Your Internship

What exactly does a DevOps Engineering Internship entail? This is a question that every intern at Liatrio has asked at one point in time or another. It is not a question that has a simple solution such as, “you will be using the same tool every day to take care of one task.” Liatrio is a dynamic company that sees a multitude of different situations on a daily basis, and the internship is designed to prepare you for this. The core of the internship process is based around a “DevOps Bootcamp”, which covers everything from our vision at Liatrio to in-depth work with a number of tools.

What to Prepare For

If there was one key thing to prepare for with this internship, it is to get ready to fail. As harsh as that may sound, it is imminent. You are taking on a field that you likely have little to no experience in, and diving into the deep end. Failure is encouraged as well as expected,  “Fail early, fail often” is a common term you will hear. This means that you are expected to fail at tasks, but also expected to learn from your failures so that they can be avoided the next time. Troubleshooting and debugging issues is where an extensive amount of knowledge is gained. Although it may be frustrating at times, looking back and seeing how easy a task that used to be difficult has become is an extremely rewarding feeling.

An Average Day

Although there will never be two identical days during the internship, there are some normalities that you can get ready for. A big one is demonstrations, or “demo’s”. You will be expected to frequently present on things you have learned, and the progress you have recently made. Presentation detail can range from a full slide show with in-depth explanations of the entire process you took, to a live run through of you demonstrating your work through a screen share. You will also be working with different tools nearly every day, most of which you are unfamiliar with. Be prepared to work with people and communicate daily as well, one of the major things Liatrio practices is transparency. This means that if someone wants to know what everyone is doing they can find out easily without having to ask a bunch of questions, which keeps everybody on the team on the same page.

“Real World” Experience

You will gain a large amount of valuable experience that will aid you in your future career, be it with Liatrio or whatever other avenues you decide to pursue. Even though the Chico office is remote from our clients, there are a number of situations and simulations that happen during the internship to provide you with a realistic experience of dealing with customers. Along with traveling to the bay area to spend time on client sites, you will be put through a simulation with your own mock-client “Normal Street Software” (with full-time Liatrio employees playing characters). This is to demonstrate some of the unexpected difficulties that Liatrio employees regularly encounter when working in our client engagements.

Posted: September 7, 2016 by Ravi Kalaga

 

DevOps BootCamp!
Wow! The DevOps BootCamp was a ton of fun and a huge success! Thank you to everyone who made it out and spent some time learning more about DevOps philosophies and the tools that support them. The Liatrio team had an awesome time interacting with all of you. If you missed the event, or did not get a DevOps BootCamp t-shirt, please go see Professor Tyson!

Internship @ Liatrio?
Hiring – Part Time Program

Alright, we are even more convinced that the right place to keep this internship program cranking is right here at Chico State!

 


 

Posted: August 11, 2016 by Chris Blackburn

 

CSU Chico Hands-On DevOps BootCamp

Hope everyone had a great summer and is ready to get back to school!

 

Come build out a system like this with us!

Come build out a system like this with us!

Tech Talk – Part Deux
We are coming back to present at CSU Chico with a much more hands-on, deep dive DevOps Boot Camp on Tuesday,  September 6th from 5-8pm. We will have a number of Liatrio DevOps engineers and Consultants, as well as our two fabulous summer interns, Tyler and Justin, demonstrate some of the work that we do.

We will show you the solutions we create as well as the tools, processes and techniques we use every day. So bring your laptop, your questions and your excitement to learn something new.

Oh yeah – and we are looking for fall interns to join Justin and Tyler and work part-time throughout the fall semester in our Chico office doing much of the same things you will learn in this session. If you are interested in a position with Liatrio, it is highly encouraged that you attend and participate in the workshop.

Please sign up below so we can get a good idea of number of people to plan our event as well as have enough food and shirts! If you have any questions, or just want to say hello, please contact us here.

 


 

Posted: June 16, 2016 by Robert Kelly

 

Happy Summer!

We hope everyone is enjoying your summer break, no matter what you are doing. We are 4 weeks into our DevOps summer internship in Chico with Tyler and Justin and things are going great, so we are already setting our sights on the Fall!

 

Tyler and Justin hammering away with the Liatrio team at the Oakland Impact Hub

Tyler and Justin hammering away with the Liatrio team at the Oakland Impact Hub

Whats coming up @ Liatrio? 

Tech Talk – Part Deux

We will be continuing our DevOps Tech Talk with Chico State and extending it to be much more hands-on, and much more technical. We are working out the details now, but stay tuned – its sure to be exciting.

Hiring – Part Time Program

Secondly, we will be hiring at least 4 more interns for part time work in the fall. We want to use the Tech Talk to show off the tools and technologies we use and drum up some excitement for working with Liatrio on a part time basis while you attend school. What could be better than having a real world, experience gaining, paying job while going to school?? Nothing!

UI Guru: Are you interested in learning front-end web development?  Maybe you’re already an established HTML, CSS, JavaScript developer.  Would you like the chance to help build or enhance an enterprise application using modern web technologies like AngularJS?  This fall we will have a great opportunity for a talented team member to enhance their skills in these areas while building applications people will use every day.  If you’ve got the skills, let us know now if you’re interested.  If you feel like web development is where you want to be but haven’t dug too deep yet, spend some time getting familiar with JavaScript, Angular, and Bootstrap this summer and let us know what you think about taking that learning further in an active software development role.

DevOps Engineer:  Are you excited to create, build and manage tools and systems that support developers through their day-day work? Do you have interest in source control management (such as Github), build tools (like TravisCI and Jenkins), Automation (such as scripting, Chef, Puppet, Vagrant) or something similar? If so, a role as a DevOps Engineer might be right up your alley. This will be Liatrio@Chico bread and butter – the large majority of our work will be in this space, supporting our consultants and their customers.

How can I prepare you ask? 
Competition is sure to be fierce for these positions. If you would like to get a head start and spend some time with the relevant technologies, we would recommend you read up on:

  • Vagrant – all our servers run on Linux, not Windows. Vagrant is the easiest way to get running with virtual machines.
  • Jenkins (both 1.6x and 2.0) – Jenkins is the defacto build/CI server.
  • Maven – while older, it is still the enterprise standard when it comes to build management.
More Updates to come
Stay tuned for more updates. If you would like to reach out to us for any reason, please do so. If you know anyone else that is interested in this information, please have them sign up below.